• 4 grams of DNA can store all the data in the world.
  • Each person will generate enough health data in their lifetime to fill 300  million books. ​
  • The cost of a lab-grown burger has dropped from 330 000 USD to 10 USD in six years time.
  • Only 3 percent of healthcare expenditure goes to prevention, the other 97 percent to treat sick people.
  • 5 percent of Americans account for 50 percent of healthcare spending.
  • The older 60+ population will doubly by 2050 to 2.1 billion. The oldest old 80+ population will triple by 2050 and increase sevenfold by 2100, reaching almost 1 billion people.
  • 90 percent of Americans already use at least one digital health tool, like wearables, online health platforms or telemedicine.
  • Currently, the amount of healthcare data is growing by 50 percent per year.
  • A child born today has a 50 percent chance of becoming 105 years old. This does not take into account all kinds of new technologies that will transform medicine and longevity.

Some of the biggest developments in health(care) will be, according to Bank of America:

– Genomics: new gene editing technologies and therapies will transform disease, personalized medicine, food and drug development. This are new technologies like CRISPR-cas9.
– Big Data/AI: an exponential growth of healthcare data and an improvement in AI algorithms will significantly impact how we treat diseases and improve wellness and health.
– Future food: plant-based meat, lab-grown meat, AgTech (agricultural technology e.g. hydroponics, vertical farming, etc), and the development of healthier, more sustainable foods provide huge opportunities.
– Healthtech: wearables, insideables, telemedicine, mobile health, brain-computer interfaces, smart implants (e.g. living drug factories made from engineered cells), nanobots, and brain implants will change how patients are treated, monitored and kept healthy.
– Ammortality: anti-aging biotech will disrupt death and aging-related diseases and pave the way towards ammortality.

Source: Bank of America / Merill Lynch